YOUR RESULTS

Plug-In Hybrid

For many, plug-in hybrids (PHEV) represent the best of both world — the ability to run fully electric for shorter distances while having the convenience of a gas engine for longer trips. Gas goes in the tank and the battery is recharged by plugging into a power source.

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Vehicle

Versatility – PHEVs are often a way for new EV drivers to dip their toe in the water. They make most sense for drivers with shorter and consistent commutes, and for drivers who do not have access to a second gas-powered vehicle. In 2023, there were 37 PHEV models available to choose from.

Charging

Level 1 and 2 Charging – A PHEV’s smaller battery mean level 1 charging (120V standard household outlet) is all many drivers need. At this speed, drivers can add about 3 to 5 miles of range to the battery each hour, which is often enough to fully charge the battery overnight. Faster charging can be achieved with a level 2 charging (240V outlet used for appliances); however, most PHEVs do not work with DC fast chargers.

Range

All-electric for most trips – The 2023 Porsche Cayenne PHEV had the shortest EPA estimated all-electric range of 15 miles, while the 2023 Mercedes S580e 4matic PHEV had the longest EPA estimated range of 56 miles. The average PHEV EPA estimated all-electric range for 2023 models was 30 miles (The Ferrari SF90 Stradale, Ferrari SF90 Spider, Ferrari 296 GTB Spider, and McLaren Artura are excluded from these averages given their MSRP values).

cost

PHEVs – like all EVs – have higher starting prices than traditional gas-powered vehicles. While federal, state, and utility incentives combined with lower fuel costs (assuming most trips only use the battery) can help offset these costs, drivers still bear the costs of maintaining a gas engine.

Emission

PHEV’s electric motor are a good way to cut emissions. However, their total benefit depends on how much drivers are able to take advantage of its all-electric range.

YOUR RESULTS

Plug-In Hybrid

For many, plug-in hybrids (PHEV) represent the best of both world — the ability to run fully electric for shorter distances while having the convenience of a gas engine for longer trips. Gas goes in the tank and the battery is recharged by plugging into a power source.

scroll to learn more

Vehicle

Versatility – PHEVs are often a way for new EV drivers to dip their toe in the water. They make most sense for drivers with shorter and consistent commutes, and for drivers who do not have access to a second gas-powered vehicle. In 2023, there were 37 PHEV models available to choose from.

CHARGING

Level 1 and 2 Charging – A PHEV’s smaller battery mean level 1 charging (120V standard household outlet) is all many drivers need. At this speed, drivers can add about 3 to 5 miles of range to the battery each hour, which is often enough to fully charge the battery overnight. Faster charging can be achieved with a level 2 charging (240V outlet used for appliances); however, most PHEVs do not work with DC fast chargers.

RANGE

All-electric for most trips – The 2023 Porsche Cayenne PHEV had the shortest EPA estimated all-electric range of 15 miles, while the 2023 Mercedes S580e 4matic PHEV had the longest EPA estimated range of 56 miles. The average PHEV EPA estimated all-electric range for 2023 models was 30 miles (The Ferrari SF90 Stradale, Ferrari SF90 Spider, Ferrari 296 GTB Spider, and McLaren Artura are excluded from these averages given their MSRP values).

COST

PHEVs – like all EVs – have higher starting prices than traditional gas-powered vehicles. While federal, state, and utility incentives combined with lower fuel costs (assuming most trips only use the battery) can help offset these costs, drivers still bear the costs of maintaining a gas engine.

EMISSION

PHEV’s electric motor are a good way to cut emissions. However, their total benefit depends on how much drivers are able to take advantage of its all-electric range.